Workshop 1

Workshop 1

Workshop on Privacy: Understanding the Concepts and Implications of Privacy in the Global South

 

Pawan Pawan Singh
Deakin University

 

Nova Ahmed & Rahat Jahangi
North South University, Dhaka

 

Mohamed Khamis
University of Glasgow

 

Pranjal Jain
Srishti Institute of Art, Design, and Technology

 

Privacy plays an important role in technology, policy and everyday life. Yet it is hard to define privacy or agree upon its boundaries. Each domain of life comes with its own expectations and conceptualization of what privacy is and how it should be regulated, maintained or limited. Keeping the conceptual malleability of privacy in mind, this workshop brings together, scholars, academic researchers, research students, industry professionals and legal and civil society practitioners for a multi-disciplinary dialogue on privacy in South Asia. This workshop helps to bring sociologist, technologist, and policymakers in the same table. We envisage organizing this dialogue through different modes of engagement such as individuals (keynote) talk, panel discussion, poster session, case studies, informal sessions, etc. The global south is still unrepresented in the global community, and the concept of privacy is a less-discussed area. This dialogue on privacy aims to generate insights about the unique challenges, opportunities, and collaborations in the work ahead on privacy regarding global south context. It looks outwards to global and comparative national contexts in the west where the privacy discourse is instructive from a legal and technological standpoint. As well the workshop considers the specific ways in which privacy will stand at the crossroads among society, law, and technology. In terms of output, the workshop holds to expand the conceptual vocabulary of privacy and enrich ‘discipline-specific’

Workshop 2

Workshop 2

Practical guidelines to design Calm Technology

 

Angeline Bhavya
Pramati Technologies

 

Technology’s original promise was to grant us more time and make us more productive human beings. Today, we see technology taking up our time, attention and energy in ways that are not beneficial to us. Humane Design and Calm Technology principles outline ways to build non-intrusive products that accommodate for human sensitivities. They can be used to design technology that avoids anxiety, stress, fear, cognitive overload, etc. and instead focus on encouraging calm, balance, focus, safety and our natural biological cycles like the circadian rhythms.  The objective of this workshop is to equip designers and product teams with guidelines and practical ways to implement the principles of Calm Technology. They would work on critiquing some existing products and also take time to design some calm product concepts.

Workshop 3

Workshop 3

A ‘Live’ Document for Emergent User Research

 

Devanuj Balkrishan; Anirudha Joshi; Manjiri Joshi IDC
IIT Bombay

 

Abhishek Shrivastava
IIT Guwahati

 

Simon Robinson
Swansea University

                  

Debjani Roy
Srishti Institute of Art Design and Technology 

 

This workshop aims to explore how to create a ‘live’ document of tools, practices, resources, and terminologies that will be continuously (1) contributed towards and (2) used by the researchers working in the domain of Emergent Users. The world of Emergent Users is evolving in a complex manner. For research for Emergent Users to remain relevant, it needs to respond to the changes in a continuous fashion. Therefore, there is a need for a ‘live’ document that does not lose relevance. This document is to be continuously updated by the researchers as they learn new knowledge during their research. At the same time, it should also act as a concurrent repository for the other researchers.

 

Please visit this link for more information https://www.devanuj.com/indiahci19-workshop

Workshop 4

Workshop 4

Technology and Imagination: Exploring Trends in Society, Culture and Design

 

Rocio Fatas
Srishti Institute of Art Design and Technology

 

Sumita Sharma
Tempere University

 

Grace Eden
Assistant Professor (HCD)
Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology Delhi

 

While we are said to live in a globalised world, cultural plurality is a reality. However, practises of design research and technological design are more often than not guided by very particular, non-diverse, non-plural ways of thinking. But does it need to be this way? This workshop aims to explore and understand culturally specific access to technological imagination through critical and speculative design. The outcomes will comprise culturally specific, non-hegemonic alternatives for technological artifacts and uses of technology.

 

Please visit this link for more information https://medium.com/@rociofatas/technology-and-imagination-exploring-trends-in-society-culture-and-design-75e5d72c5c33

Workshop 5

Workshop 5

Creative Expression in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

 

Harshit Agrawal
Conduent Labs

 

Over the last few years, AI has found an increasing role in various fields, be it transportation, healthcare, entertainment- pretty much every industry out there. However, what about the domain of creative expression and experiences? The world of experiences today is quickly moving towards free-form interactions, be it through voice, gesture, emotion or other forms of input recognition, and these coupled with the ability to understand patterns and make sense of large amounts of data are making experiences personalized as opposed to remaining generalized. Therefore, it is fast becoming a critical skill today to be able to ‘understand, talk and make with’ AI, even for people engaged in the creative fields, or art, design, music, literature, and pretty much any other creative domain. Through this workshop, we collectively explore tools of prototyping and sketching with AI and machine learning, by grounding them into building interactive pieces with it. We discuss works of some individuals actively involved in the art and creativity domain, and discuss various ethical issues that arise when enough critical thought is not put into designing AI products and how some artists are responding to this through their work.

Workshop 6

Workshop 6

Ethics Sprint

 

Aparna Ashok

 

AI systems power various facets that influence an average citizen’s everyday life. Technological advancements in the field of Artificial Intelligence is progressing by leaps and bounds and these breakthroughs have profound social implications that society is unprepared for. This workshop aims to provide participants with a practical understanding of ethical issues that arise and design principles that can be used when designing and implementing AI systems. Key themes are the six ethical considerations when building humane technology – wellbeing, privacy, safety, inclusion, accountability, and trust. The participants will be divided into groups and will be given a lens to anticipate risks and opportunities. They will identify a future use case scenario for a given product and design a response. The output could be in the form of a new feature, product or business strategy.

Workshop 7

Workshop 7

What Indian HCI Doctoral researchers study?

 

Amit Jena; Shimmila Bhowmick
IITB-Monash Research Academy; IIT Guwahati

 

The question “What HCI Doctoral Researchers Study” has two parts. First, it asks how HCI doctoral researchers think about the research challenges they tackle: how do they decide what problems to engage with and how to study them? Second, it also interrogates the subject of HCI: which challenges should researchers address and, ultimately, what makes us unique as a discipline? While there have been intermittent discussions on this topic in HCI, the present workshop emphasizes this question and explore some possible answers among a group of doctoral researchers: those who have completed Ph.D. in HCI, those who are doing it currently, and those who would like to begin their Ph.D. process. One reason is our belief that researchers can benefit from addressing these questions so as to develop their practical understanding of how to tackle the complexity of selecting “a good research question”. Second, we argue that doctoral researchers can benefit from thinking about the epistemological grounds upon which they base their everyday work, that is, thinking about what HCI is. The workshop results in feedback from seasoned researchers on the work of doctoral researchers at various stages of their research.

 

Please visit this link for more information https://amitjenaiitbm.github.io/IndiaHCI2019/